Lindsay Lohan jailed for 90 days Wednesday, Jul 7 2010 

TROUBLED LINDSAY LOHAN wept as she was sentenced to 90 days in jail last night.

The Mean Girls star, 24, violated her probation for a 2007 drink-driving charge by repeatedly missing alcohol education classes.She insisted she did not realise she was breaking the order and that her work schedule had stopped her attending regularly.

I have tried to do the best I can. I really did think I was doing what I was supposed to do, and I mean it with all my heart

Shocked ... Lindsay at the hearing

Pregnant mother, pregnant daughter battle H1N1 Tuesday, Nov 3 2009 

Lancaster, California (CNN) — Nancy Brizendine’s slow-paced life in Californias Antelope Valley has become something of a slick race track.The first stunner, at 42 years old, in her 11th year of taking birth control pills, was that Brizendine and her live-in boyfriend and fishing buddy were expecting a baby.

I was shocked. I didn’t even think I could get pregnant, Brizendine said.But concern over having a baby in her 40s soon gave way to the joy of becoming a mother for the third time.Then, about 2½ weeks ago, came another sudden turn. Brizendine, a medical assistant, caught the H1N1 flu virus.

pregnant.h1n1

Nancy Brizendine, 42, and her daughter Kayla Yost, 22, are both pregnant and had H1N1.

I had a cough, sinus infection, infected ear, fever, and thats when I went into urgent care and tested positive, Brizendine recalled.There were times when I honestly could not get out of bed because I was so sick and achy.Brizendine began worrying about how the swine flu would affect her baby, due in January.

Scientists Find New ‘Ebola’ Like Virus in Africa Friday, May 29 2009 

ATLANTA  —  Scientists have identified a lethal new virus in Africa that causes bleeding like the dreaded Ebola virus.

The so-called “Lujo” virus infected five people in Zambia and South Africa last fall. Four of them died, but a fifth survived, perhaps helped by a medicine recommended by the scientists.  It’s not clear how the first person became infected, but the bug comes from a family of viruses found in rodents, said Dr. Ian Lipkin, a Columbia University epidemiologist involved in the discovery.

“This one is really, really aggressive” he said of the virus. A paper on the virus by Lipkin and his collaborators was published online Thursday on in PLoS Pathogens. The outbreak started in September, when a female travel agent who lives on the outskirts of Lusaka, Zambia, became ill with a fever-like illness that quickly grew much worse.

She was airlifted to Johannesburg, South Africa, where she died. A paramedic in Lusaka who treated her also became sick, was transported to Johannesburg and died. The three others infected were health care workers in Johannesburg.Investigators believe the virus spread from person to person through contact with infected body fluids.

“It’s not a kind of virus like the flu that can spread widely,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which helped fund the research.The name given to the virus — “Lujo” — stems from Lusaka and Johannesburg, the cities where it was first identified. Investigators in Africa thought the illness might be Ebola, because some of the patients had bleeding in the gums and around needle injection sites, said Stuart Nichol, chief of the molecular biology lab in the CDC’s Special Pathogens Branch. Other symptoms include include fever, shock, coma and organ failure.

Genetic extracts of blood and liver from the victims were tested at Columbia University in New York, and additional testing was done at CDC in Atlanta. Tests determined it belonged to the arenavirus family, and that it is distantly related to Lassa fever, another disease found in Africa. The drug ribavirin, which is given to Lassa victims, was given to the fifth Lujo virus patient — a Johannesburg nurse. It’s not clear if the medicine made a difference or if she just had a milder case of the disease, but she fully recovered, Nichol said.

The research is a startling example of how quickly scientists can now identify new viruses, Fauci said. Using genetic sequencing techniques, the virus was identified in a matter of a few days — a process that used to take weeks or longer.Along with Fauci’s institute, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Google also helped fund the research.